Polish folk costume series: Jamno costume

Here's the first in my series of Polish folk costumes.

There are so many different regions and costumes here in Poland that it can be overwhelming. This is why I'm going to focus on only one at a time. 

Today's is the Jamno costume.

 photo taken from the book  "Polska Stroje Ludowe", "Poland Folk Costumes"  (I can buy one for you if you contact me soon assuming you live in the USA as my kids are coming over for Christmas and I can send it to you in January via my kids. If you are in Europe, it is absolutely not problem  - I can get it for you at any time. If you are farther away like Asia, we can talk.)

photo taken from the book  "Polska Stroje Ludowe", "Poland Folk Costumes"  (I can buy one for you if you contact me soon assuming you live in the USA as my kids are coming over for Christmas and I can send it to you in January via my kids. If you are in Europe, it is absolutely not problem  - I can get it for you at any time. If you are farther away like Asia, we can talk.)

Jamno and Labusz are located near Germany and the Baltic Sea - on the northwest side of Poland. There is quite a long history related to this region, involving dislocation of the native peoples and relocation of others. However, I'd rather not go there, but if you want, you can find more at the link below that says that I didn't want to just take that person's material.

 

Jamno region of Poland.jpg

 

 

 There are many differences in modern versions of these outfits because modern versions are adjusted for comfort and affordability.

There are many differences in modern versions of these outfits because modern versions are adjusted for comfort and affordability.

 photo from the book  "Polska Stroje Ludowe/Poland Folk Costumes"

photo from the book  "Polska Stroje Ludowe/Poland Folk Costumes"

The lady's costume consisted of a white lace headband and a cloth bonnet trimmed with fur, a white cotton blouse (one source said cotton, others said linen) with a ruffle around the neck, a vest made from wool (pictured here) and three skirts - the topmost skirt was made from wool and had red binding around the bottom of the hem - shown on both pictures above -  the other two skirts were petticoats or underskirts. There was also an apron of white linen with 2 or 3 tucks in it towards the bottom of the hem, a bodice and other items as shown.

The men had a hat made of wool - the same fabric as used for their vests - and the women's vest as well - a scarf, a vest, and a navy blue coat with red trim. Of course, trousers and boots (see picture above).

The stripes on the vests of the men and women were straight up and down on the front but diagonal on the back, forming a "v".

 photo from the website    http://folkcostume.blogspot.co.uk/2016/11/costume-of-jamund-jamno-pomerania.html

photo from the website  

http://folkcostume.blogspot.co.uk/2016/11/costume-of-jamund-jamno-pomerania.html

 Here is the matching four cornered hat for the men.    photo taken from the website -  folkcostume.blogspot.co.uk

Here is the matching four cornered hat for the men.  

photo taken from the website - folkcostume.blogspot.co.uk

These outfits were worn mainly for festive occasions - at least in the more recent past - and were distinct to their region. People could tell where they were from by their costumes.

Do people wear these outfits here nowadays?  No.  Only for special days.  Many dance groups wear them when they do their regional dancing and perform for festivals. Some restaurants that specialize in being "Polish" would have the waiters and waitresses in such costumes. 

And now you know. 

I hope to give you an overview and a taste of what these costumes are like. I think they are beautiful and fascinating!


Be sure to check out the goodies my sis has for you in the store!  She's pretty busy filling orders from the recent bonus special, but would love to serve you!

Becky PetersenComment